Unifying Alabama's Traffic Safety Efforts
     Working Together to Save Lives    
 
Road Improvements
CORRECT stands for Cost-benefit Optimization for the Reduction of Roadway Environment Caused Tragedies. This system was first developed for Alabama in the mid-1970s, and it was obtained National recognition for its innovative approach toward allocating highway safety funds at that time. As its name implies, it is designed to help estimate the costs and benefits for alternative safety treatments to be applied across the highway system in order to make those improvements that collectively return the highest total safety benefit to the roadway users of Alabama. It recognizes that location decisions cannot be made without total system considerations. It provides a work-flow model so that a uniform approach toward critical crash location investigation can take place by a number of teams working simultaneously across the system.
 
The CORRECT software has been built as an Excel Workbook into which multiple cases and multiple locations can be added and evaluated simultaneously. The following diagram shows how CORRECT and CARE interact, and it also depicts the overall workflow process.

For more information about CORRECT, click here.
Birmingham to Host Public Meetings for Space Under I-59/20 Bridges
ALDOT: The public will have an opportunity to have its say about the design of the future space under the bridges of a major interstate that runs through Birmingham. Three sessions – 10 a.m. to noon, noon to 2 p.m. and 5-7 p.m. – will be held on July 17 at the Boutwell Municipal Auditorium. Three more sessions – during those same times – will be held on July 24 at the Birmingham CrossPlex – Bill Harris Arena.

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Enhancing Safety & Operations at Complex Interchanges
U.S. DOT: This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 and chapter 2 provide background information and a contemporary literature and policies summary, respectively. Chapter 3 describes the development and categorization of attributes typical of complex interchanges. Chapter 4 describes the site evaluation and selection process, basis for the field study, and input for the practices evaluation. Chapter 5 presents the practices evaluation, including information on a new method of evaluating traffic control devices (TCDs) alongside this project’s examination of contemporary practices throughout the United States and Canada. Chapters 6 and 7 describe the simulator study and field study, respectively, detailing the study methodologies, data collection, and analyses. Chapter 8 presents the research results, which in combination with the practices evaluation in chapter 5, forms the foundation of the recommendations in chapter 9.

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Safety Evaluation of Horizontal Curve Realignment on Rural, Two-Lane Roads
U.S. DOT: This study evaluates the safety effectiveness of horizontal curve realignment by increasing the radius of curved roadway segments on two-lane rural roads. One objective of this strategy is to reduce lane departure crashes, especially run-off-road crashes. The evaluation results showed substantial and significant reduction in crashes (total, injury and fatal crashes, run-off-road, and fixed object crashes, dark crashes, and wet-road crashes). The economic analysis revealed that increasing the radius of a horizontally curved roadway segment on two-lane, rural roads is a costeffective safety improvement for reducing all types of crashes. This document is intended for safety engineers, highway designers, planners, and practitioners at State and local agencies involved with AASHTO Strategic Highway Safety Plan implementation.

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Unsignalized Intersection Improvement Guide (Types of Problems)
UIIG: There are many problems that can occur at an unsignalized intersection.  Problems could be specific to an individual intersection, occur along a section of road with successive unsignalized intersections, or be a systemic problem throughout a jurisdiction. The first four problem types comprise issues concerning the perception of the intersection or its traffic control; the next three relate to safety or operational deficiencies; and the last three entail issues of user decision-making and behavior.  The existence of one or more of these problems can contribute to crashes at unsignalized intersections and the injuries and fatalities that result.

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Relationships among Perception-Reaction Times, Emergency Decel Rates, & Crash Outcomes
From the Mountain Plains Consortium Report: Perception-Reaction Time (PRT) and deceleration rate are two key components in geometric design of highways and streets. Combined with a design speed, they determine the minimum required stopping sight distance (SSD). Current American Association of Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) SSD guidance related to PRT and deceleration rate are based on 90th percentile PRT and 10th percentile deceleration rate values from experiments that were completed in Texas in the mid-1990s (3).  The objectives of this research were: 1) evaluating differences in perception-reaction times (PRT) and deceleration rates between crash and near-crash events, 2) assessing the correlation between PRT and deceleration rate, 3) determining if there is a causal relationship between PRT and deceleration rate (and what it is), and 4) developing predictive models for PRT and deceleration rate that can be used for roadway design and crash reconstruction.

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Safety Evaluation of Multiple Strategies at Signalized Intersections
USDOT FHA: This study evaluated multiple low-cost treatments at signalized intersections. Improvements included basic signing, pavement marking, and signal enhancements. This strategy is intended to reduce the frequency and severity of crashes at signalized intersections by alerting drivers to the presence, type, and configuration of the approaching intersection. Many studies have explored the safety effectiveness of some of the individual countermeasures. However, no study has conducted a rigorous evaluation of the effectiveness of installing packages of these strategies in combination across many intersections. This study sought to fill this knowledge gap.

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Safety Benefits of Highway Infrastructure Investments - May 2017
From AAA: Among developed nations, the United States ranks nearly last in terms of annual traffic fatalities per 100,000 population. A total of 35,092 people died, and hundreds of thousands more were seriously injured, in traffic crashes on roads and streets in the United States during 2015.

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Roadway Design - System-Wide Safety Treatements and Design Guidance for J-Turns
This report seeks to document ways to reduce crashes and fatalities from wrong-way crashes, horizontal curves, intersections, and J-turns.

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Safety Compass Newsletter | Winter 2017

This is a publication of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) that reports on safety developments from across the country.

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Flashing Yellow Arrow
Drive Safe Alabama: The new flashing yellow arrow means turns are permitted, BUT you must first yield to oncoming traffic and pedestrians, then turn with caution. A flashing yellow arrow signal offers a safer, more efficient way to handle traffic turning left at busy intersections.

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