Unifying Alabama's Traffic Safety Efforts
     Working Together to Save Lives    
 
Road Improvements
CORRECT stands for Cost-benefit Optimization for the Reduction of Roadway Environment Caused Tragedies. This system was first developed for Alabama in the mid-1970s, and it was obtained National recognition for its innovative approach toward allocating highway safety funds at that time. As its name implies, it is designed to help estimate the costs and benefits for alternative safety treatments to be applied across the highway system in order to make those improvements that collectively return the highest total safety benefit to the roadway users of Alabama. It recognizes that location decisions cannot be made without total system considerations. It provides a work-flow model so that a uniform approach toward critical crash location investigation can take place by a number of teams working simultaneously across the system.
 
The CORRECT software has been built as an Excel Workbook into which multiple cases and multiple locations can be added and evaluated simultaneously. The following diagram shows how CORRECT and CARE interact, and it also depicts the overall workflow process.

For more information about CORRECT, click here.
Safety Benefits of Highway Infrastructure Investments - May 2017
From AAA: Among developed nations, the United States ranks nearly last in terms of annual traffic fatalities per 100,000 population. A total of 35,092 people died, and hundreds of thousands more were seriously injured, in traffic crashes on roads and streets in the United States during 2015.

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Roadway Design - System-Wide Safety Treatements and Design Guidance for J-Turns
This report seeks to document ways to reduce crashes and fatalities from wrong-way crashes, horizontal curves, intersections, and J-turns.

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Safety Compass Newsletter | Winter 2017

This is a publication of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) that reports on safety developments from across the country.

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Flashing Yellow Arrow
Drive Safe Alabama: The new flashing yellow arrow means turns are permitted, BUT you must first yield to oncoming traffic and pedestrians, then turn with caution. A flashing yellow arrow signal offers a safer, more efficient way to handle traffic turning left at busy intersections.

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WSFA: Flashing yellow arrow signals coming to Chantilly Parkway and Atlanta Highway in Montgomery, Alabama.

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AASHTO Says Complexity of Proposed FHWA Rule ‘Would Overwhelm’ States, MPOs
AASHTO: ​Though supportive of some aspects, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials warned that other elements of a wide-ranging regulatory proposal from the Federal Highway Administration "would overwhelm" states and local agencies with major compliance costs by requiring them to track and report on "millions of data points."

AASHTO filed its extensive comments Aug. 15 in response to the FHWA's proposed "National Performance Management Measures: Assessing Performance of the National Highway System, Freight Movement on the Interstate System, and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program." The FHWA issued the lengthy rulemaking notice on April 22 and set an Aug. 20 deadline for comments.

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Alabama Ceremony Completes I-22 Project

On June 20 in Birmingham, Alabama marked the completion of the final section of Interstate 22, a 213-mile highway linking that city with Memphis, Tenn., along the US 78 corridor.

The ribbon was cut for the I-22 Interchange at I-65, which completed a 98-mile segment in Alabama on what was called "Corridor X" until it garnered the I-22 designation in 2004.

        

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The Alabama CORRECT System
CORRECT stands for Cost-benefit Optimization for the Reduction of Roadway Environment Caused Tragedies. This system was first developed for Alabama in the mid-1970s, and it was obtained National recognition for its innovative approach toward allocating highway safety funds at that time. As its name implies, it is designed to help estimate the costs and benefits for alternative safety treatments to be applied across the highway system in order to make those improvements that collectively return the highest total safety benefit to the roadway users of Alabama. It recognizes that location decisions cannot be made without total system considerations. It provides a work-flow model so that a uniform approach toward critical crash location investigation can take place by a number of teams working simultaneously across the system.

The CORRECT software has been built as an Excel Workbook into which multiple cases and multiple locations can be added and evaluated simultaneously. The following diagram shows how CORRECT and CARE interact, and it also depicts the overall workflow process.



The following summarizes the CORRECT workflow model:
  • The process begins with the existing roadway which experiences crashes, and the corresponding crash reports that are generated are processed by CARE.
  • CARE generates two outputs of relevance in this model: (1) a listing of the most critical locations that are in need of further investigations, and (2) the corresponding standardized report summaries for these locations, which are used in the field investigations. This does not preclude the investigation team from interacting directly with CARE to perform comparisons and to query the system to determine the factors that would be most instrumental in reducing crashes at each location; in fact, this is highly recommended.
  • This information is used by the field investigation teams to perform a rigorous and consistent analysis of the crashes at each of the locations. While CARE can provide a view of the crash site, it is highly recommended that the team go to the crash site and involve the law enforcement officers who actually investigated the crashes that occurred there. It is the synthesis of all of these data at this point enables them to formulate effective and tailored solutions (as opposed to blanket solutions that may have little effect on the location.
  • The result of this evaluation along with the experiences of the reporting officer and access to published results of countermeasure evaluation studies leads to the completion of the Crash Analysis Site Evaluation (CASE) form.
  • The CASE form information is sufficient to produce an estimate of the cost and the benefit of each countermeasure proposed at each location. Established injury, fatality and property damage costs per crash are then applied to the past crashes that have occurred here to improve the cost-benefit estimates.
  • The cost and benefit estimates are sufficient to produce an optimal policy, i.e., a specification of the set of countermeasures that: (1) fit within the available budget allocated to this particular round of roadway improvements, and (2) produce the maximum possible benefit in terms of the established costing function of reduced fatalities, injuries and property damage crashes.
  • Those cases chosen for implementation define the roadway improvements. The CARE before-after analysis can be applied at this point to measure the effectiveness of the treatment applied, as the upgraded roadway system produces an improved safety record with fewer crashes, injuries and fatalities. The process is repeated bringing benefits upon each wave of treatments.

CORRECT is an easy to use Excel-based system. It formalizes the process that is probably used in most states, but perhaps sub-optimally due to the lack of a total systems approach. The CORRECT process is based totally on (1) the most effective information that can be produced from the data , and (2) the people who know the local roadways best – the investigation teams. This data are synthesized state-wide, and the best possible improvements are implemented.

The application opens a control panel sheet from which a number of commands can be initiated. These are divided into three classes: (1) editing of parameters and pick lists, (2) creation the new analysis sheet, and (3) creating the summary.

The evaluations are dependent upon the road classification (i.e., the way that the location is encoded) and whether the route is Urban or Rural. For each combination of these classifications, a set of annual crash frequencies is used to derive the overall Benefit/Cost values and ratios. Each workbook can contain multiple CASE sheets (scenarios) that all utilize the same basic parameters that are set up in a single Parameters sheet. The Parameters sheet is used to set up the primary parameters that are used for all CASE sheets in the workbook. The worksheet below is the control panel for the CORRECT system.